Tag Archives: singing

What I’m up to

Editing photos, which always makes me kinda crabby, because it’s tedious.  I have always disliked tedious tasks, you can ask my mother if you don’t believe me ;)

Waiting for the Time Lord perfume to finish the magic in the bottle…oh yes, time lord, as in Dr. Who.  :D  Didn’t I tell you?  :D  It will come in a blue bottle too!  Aren’t I clever ;)

Working on my game plan for the year.

Looking forward to my rehearsals starting up again for Roslyn Stone.

What about you all?  What’s on your plates for the year?

Roslyn Stone Concert

 

That is all :)

My apologies

I’m sorry I’ve not been your regularly scheduled blogger, just with Christmas/Yule and other things coming up, I’ve had a lot on my plate.  I traveled this past weekend to my parent’s house for Christmas with my family, and turned right around after arriving home, to a rehearsal for the Roslyn Stone concert next Sunday.  EEK!  I’m singing a couple of solos, one in German, and a trio in French.  German must be memorized.  *note to self, remember to breathe*

It is also the time of year, biologically where we are supposed to slow down, and reflect on life, the universe, and everything.  (the answer to that is 42 for all of you Hitchhiker’s guide the universe fans)  I find myself feeling like hibernating…

I *might* be developing a Dr. Who perfume.  Yes, like what the Doctor might wear.  Stay tuned.

Perfume Odds and Ends

Hi everyone!

Yesterday was super busy for me.  Sorry I missed posting something interesting to read, and think about.

I have been working on getting some info together for a class about the history of perfume, that I am doing tonight at Wheatsfield.  That’s the local organic food co-op.  Also I am getting together a package for Miss Malaprop.  I will be consigning with her :)
There’s also the usual, drive children places, educate them, and play with toddler.  Everyone is mostly healthy again, and YAY for working plumbing!

I need to fit in a photo shoot for my solid perfume tubes, and 3ml sprays.

I also need to memorize some music for Roslyn Stone, my women’s singing ensemble.  Our Christmas Concert is Dec. 18th at the Unity Church in Des Moines, IA, at 6PM if you are so inclined to come, and want to hear me sing.  I’m singing a solo…in German :D

Roslyn Stone

Roslyn Stone

Look at how sassy we are ;)

FYI we have a facebook page, amongst other things.  Roslyn Stone on Facebook  Roslyn Stone website where you can find gig info.

In other words, I’m sitting around eating premium ice cream alot :D

Scentual Sunday

Jules Massenet

Image via Wikipedia

Amelita Galli-Curci sings a song by Jules Massenet called ‘Crepuscule’, or ‘Twilight’.

The song is SO simple, really serving to emphasize the beauty of the dusk. The gentle turns in the vocal line sound like the world settling in for the night, much like the lilies, the ladybirds, and the lovers that the text mentions.

And from answers.com:

This, from Massenet’s collection Poème pastoral, is one of his most delicate and understated songs, with, in the hands of the right performers, a haunting effect as insubstantial as the twilight that it describes.

The accompaniment is almost completely in the treble, and consists largely of light, quick arpeggios, separated by extended rests. The vocal part, with frequent chromaticisms, is equally understated, without any wide intervals, changes in dynamics, or even a distinctive melodic line.

Massenet later orchestrated it under the same title, for string orchestra and flute, violin, and cello. ~ Anne Feeney, Rovi

Scentual Sunday

Sketch of stage design for Mozart's opera Die ...

Image via Wikipedia

Die Zauberflöte, (K. 620) is an opera in two acts composed in 1791 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. The work is in the form of a Singspiel, a popular form that included both singing and spoken dialogue.

Act II Scene 7: A hall in the temple of Ordeal

Tamino and Papageno must again suffer the test of silence, a more difficult variation this time: Pamina enters and tries to speak with Tamino. Since Tamino silently refuses to answer, Pamina believes he no longer loves her. (Aria: “Ach, ich fühl’s, es ist verschwunden”) She leaves in despair.

Ach, ich fühl’s, is considered one of the most beautiful pieces of music in the Magic Flute, and perhaps in all of Mozart Opera. The Orchestral accompaniment presses forward as if desperate heart was beating, and when coupled with the lyric vocal line, shows us Pamina’s pain and longing for Tamino. In the premiere performance of Die Zauberflöte the role of Pamina was sung by the 17-year-old Anna Gottlieb. Gottlieb had previously created the role of Barbarina in Le Nozze di Figaro
Ach, ich fühl's - Pamina's aria from Die Zauberflöte
Ach, ich fühl's, es ist verschwunden,  Ah, I feel it, it has disappeared
Ewig hin der Liebe Glück!              Forever gone  love's  happiness!
Nimmer kommt ihr Wonnestunde           Nevermore will come the hour of bliss
Meinem Herzen mehr zurück!             Back to my heart!
Sieh', Tamino, diese Tränen,           See, Tamino, these tears,
Fließen, Trauter, dir allein!          Flowing, beloved,  for you alone!
Fühlst du nicht der Liebe Sehnen,      If you don't feel the longing of love
So wird Ruh' im Tode sein!             Then there will be peace in death!

Scentual Sunday

Monteverdi – “Pur ti miro, pur ti godo” – L’Incoronazione di Poppea

Claudio Monteverdi

L’incoronazione di Poppea (SV 308, The Coronation of Poppea) is an Italian baroque opera comprising a prologue and three acts, first performed in Venice during the 1642–43 carnival season. The music, attributed to Claudio Monteverdi, is a setting of a libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello. One of the first operas to use historical events and people rather than classical mythology, it adapts incidents from the writings of Tacitus, Suetonius and others to recount how Poppea, mistress of the Roman emperor Nerone (Nero), is able to achieve her ambition and be crowned empress. The opera was revived in Naples in 1651, but was then neglected until the rediscovery of the score in 1888, after which it became the subject of scholarly attention in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Since the 1960s, the opera has been performed and recorded many times.

The original manuscript of the score does not exist; two surviving copies from the 1650s show significant divergences from each other, and each differs to some extent from the libretto. How much of the music is actually Monteverdi’s, and how much the product of others, is a matter of dispute. None of the existing versions of the libretto, printed or manuscript, can be definitively tied to the first performance at the Teatro Santi Giovanni e Paolo, the precise date of which is unknown. Details of the original cast are few, and largely speculative, and there is no record of the opera’s initial public reception. Despite these uncertainties, the work is generally accepted as part of the Monteverdi operatic canon, his last and perhaps his greatest work.

In a departure from traditional literary morality it is the adulterous liaison of Poppea and Nerone which triumphs, although this victory is demonstrated by history to have been transitory and hollow. Moreover, in Busenello’s version of the story all the major characters are morally compromised. Written when the genre of opera was only a few decades old, the music for L’incoronazione di Poppea has been praised for its originality, its melody, and for its reflection of the human attributes of its characters. The work helped to redefine the boundaries of theatrical music, and established Monteverdi as the leading musical dramatist of his time.

This scene come from Act III, Nerone and Poppea sing a rapturous love duet (“I gaze at you, I possess you”) as the opera ends.

Pur ti miro

Pur ti miro,
Pur ti godo,
Pur ti stringo,
Pur t’annodo,
Più non peno,
Più non moro,
O mia vita, o mi tesoro.
Io son tua…
Tuo son io…
Speme mia, dillo, dì,
Tu sei pur, speme mia
L’idol mio, dillo, dì,
Tu sei pur,
Sì, mio ben,
Sì, mio cor, mia vita, sì.
Pur ti miro,
Pur ti godo,
Pur ti stringo,
Pur t’annodo,
Più non peno,
Più non moro,
O mia vita, o mi tesoro.

(Rough English translation)

Simply I aim you,
Simply I enjoy you,
Simply I condense you,
Simply I tie you,
More I do not suffer,
More not dark,
Or my life, or me treasury.
I son yours…
Your son I…
Hope mine, dillo, dì,
You are simply, hope mine
The idol mine, dillo, dì,
You are simply,
Yes, mine quite,
Yes, my cor, my life, yes.
Simply I aim you,
Simply I enjoy you,
Simply I condense you,
Simply I tie you,
More I do not suffer,
More not dark,
Or my life, or me treasury.